Repairing a Roboquad

I’ve always been interested in robots, and in recent years some of the stuff available as toys has been really interesting. One of the main players is Wowwee who have over the years produced loads of interesting stuff, perhaps most famously the Robosapien which has been through several versions over the years. However they have done others too. I bought a Roboquad off ebay a few years ago:

 

Roboquad

This is a very clever design which uses only four motors (one per leg) to move around using crab-style walk. The head and neck is also articulated, and it has light & IR sensors in the eyes. There are loads of programming options and for a toy it’s quite advanced.

It’s been put away for a few years, and when I got it out again I found that because I’d used cheap batteries in the remote control (never a good idea) they had leaked acid everywhere and completely rotted through the springs and contacts completely destroying the battery compartment. To make matters worse when I put batteries in the robot itself it was completely dead and didn’t power up.

So before throwing it out I decided to investigate further. Unfortunately given that this is now quite old a lot of the info about them is hidden away in old forums but I was able to find a basic disassembly guide.

You have to start by turning it over and removing all the screws in sight, including one in each corner which is hidden under the leg. Once you done this you can separate the top and bottom, but you need to be careful to unplug the cables which connect the sensors from the head to the main board.

Given that it was completely dead, I did a few tests to make sure that the voltage from the battery was getting through, which it was and there was nothing else obviously wrong. So the next step was to unplug all the connectors in sight and get the board itself out. You need to be quite careful doing this as there are lot of them and some of them are quite stiff, but with a bit of gentle pressure you can get them all out.

I had a good look at the board when out and there wasn’t anything obviously wrong with it. However what I have learned by now is that the most likely point of failure with modern electronics is the large discrete components like electrolytic capacitors. So I desoldered and removed the largest ones and replaced them with some new ones.

I wasn’t optimistic, but to my great surprise once I had reassembled it the robot now worked fine! It’s possible that it wasn’t the capacitors, and it might have simply been the act of disassembly and reseating all the connectors but either way I was pleased.

The next step was to fix the remote control. Whilst the battery springs were completely destroyed by the battery acid, the actual contacts themselves were OK. So I tried jamming the batteries in with some coils of unused solder as impromptu springs. This worked up to a point but it wasn’t reliable and I gave up. The only thing to do was replace the battery holder completely.

The remote uses 3 AAA batteries, and fortunately a suitable holder is easy to find on ebay and other sources:

Image result for 3x aaa battery holder

Then it was a matter of fitting it. The original remote had the battery holder moulded out of the plastic the back was made out of. It originally looked like this:

So what I had to do was break out the trusty Dremel and use it with a cutting wheel to remove the whole compartment. This turned out to be quite a job because the plastic was surprisingly thick in places. However eventually I was left with this:

The battery holder just fits through the hole, and the battery cover holds in in place perfectly. Having resoldered the wires I now have a working remote as well.

So all in all a good result – both robot and remote repaired and working for total expenditure of a few pounds. Hopefully this may help other in the same situation as I found it quite difficult to find much useful info given the age of these toys.

Texecom Connect – still waiting…

It’s been a little whilst since the last post, but I have been waiting for there to be some devleopments with Texecom to write about. My system is working pretty well now and so I’m looking forward to more developments.

However looking back I’ve realised that it’s nearly a year since Texecom made their big announcement of ‘Texecom Connect’ with promise of integration with home automation and various other goodies. However since then things have largely gone quiet and there hasn’t been a firmware update for almost a year as well.

There is some evidence of stuff going on behind the scenes including the wireless firmware upgrade, and I’ve just heard of another one which is intended to support a wireless keypad. This sounds like an interesting development as there hasn’t been a new keypad for quite some time.

So I’m keeping fingers crossed that we will hear something soon. In the meantime I am working on my home automation gear with quite a few interesting things to talk about so will post about these soon.

Integrating Home Automation & Alarm

I have been thinking lately about improving my approach to home automation, and particularly in making better use of the various technologies I’ve got. I think one of the mistakes made in home automation generally is neglecting the ‘automation’ part. I’ve seen plenty of approaches which really just substitute one set of switches for another (albeit electronic). I can’t see much point in in switching lights on and off using a phone or remote when it’s much easier to do so using the light switch! So really what you want is a largely automatic system which anticipates your needs and does what you want without user intervention.

So far as I have written about before I already have a mixture of systems with MAX for heating (currently controlled using FHEM) and Z-Wave for which I have been using a Vera Lite. I have been using a 3rd party plugin which provided an interface between the Texecom panel and the Vera, but in spite of this I’ve never been that happy with it as a controller. The interface is rather old fashioned, the newer updates (so called UI7) have had a decidedly mixed reception and I’ve never really felt I understood how to program it properly. Whilst the UI looks pretty it was also rather clunky when you tried to use it.

I’ve written before about FHEM and whilst I know it’s not everyone’s cup of tea I have really got to like it because although it looks unappealing it gives you a huge amount of information and lets you do pretty much anything you want with a few command lines. I also think that it helps you understand a lot more about the devices you are using. So the obvious thing to do was to bring all my Z-Wave devices into FHEM and try to integrate heating and lighting and also build integration with the Texecom panel.

The key to all this is a USB Z-Wave adapter for my main server. These don’t come cheap and there is some choice. I eventually bought an Aeotec Z-Stick Gen5, which came recommended but pretty expensive at about £40.

aeotec-z-wave-usb-z-stick-526

 

There are others available, including the Z-Wave.Me UZB which seems rather cheaper. This should also work with FHEM and other software although the Aeotec seems slightly better established. The other and much cheaper option is to use an experimental method whereby CULFW devices can be set up as Z-Wave controllers. However this lacks some of the benefits of the proper controllers (including battery back up etc) and probably is not for ‘production’ systems just yet.

So far all has gone well. FHEM recognised the controller and configured it correctly. I had to ‘exclude’ all the devices from the Vera to reset them and then ‘include’ to the Z-Stick. You can do this either by physically taking the stick to the device and pressing the button on the stick, or else simply setting the Z-Stick into ‘inclusion mode’ from FHEM and then doing whatever is needed on the device.

I would recommend doing the latter, as then FHEM will automatically pick up and configure the devices for you. I now have a variety of Fibaro devices and a Minimote which are all available as devices in FHEM with a lot of detail about them. I have recreated a few scenes which I was using before (such as one which turns on a few table lamps in the front room).

Now I need to find a better way of integrating with the alarm. I am using an Arduino with one of the outputs from the panel to report whether the alarm is set or unset and therefore whether the house is occupied or not. I’m using this at the moment to trigger a ‘notify’ event in FHEM which sets the heating into low power mode and now sends Z-Wave events which turns off all the lights. What I would really like is to get FHEM to interface directly with the panel to read out the status of the sensors etc directly. I have been able to get some information about this so I am going to see if I can learn how to do this.

As always I’d be very interested to hear from anyone else who is exploring this kind of thing.

Ricochet Firmware Update

I’ve just had a product bulletin from Texecom which has left me scratching my head a bit:

new firmware

This is obviously something to do with the forthcoming v4.0 firmware version for the Elite panels, and Texecom have already announced that they are releasing a range of other home automation devices which will form part of the Ricochet network. However this suggests that you won’t be able to use at least some of them unless you have the latest version of the Ricochet firmware.

The bulletin then says ominously “wireless expanders are not field-programmable” and so this would suggest that you will need a new expander if you are going to use the new gear. This is a pain, as they are quite expensive and presumably the hardware is exactly the same.

What isn’t clear is what happens if you have the panels which have the built in Ricochet (Premier Elite 48-W etc) – perhaps the wireless upgrade will be rolled in to the panel firmware?

It’s a pain for me as I have the 8XP-W expander and I don’t really fancy buying a new one. However I am hoping that this announcement means that we will see the v4 panel firmware released soon.

UPDATE

I’ve now got clarity on this – the expander firmware is not upgradeable and the -W panels with the integrated expander are the same. So unfortunately this will mean replacing either the expander or the whole panel if you want the new version. It appears that some of the new devices may still work with the older expanders but that remains to be seen.

Rounding up a few updates

There have been loads of interesting comments and I’m grateful to everyone who has contributed. A couple of things to highlight:

You can get cheap and compatible tags on ebay which are much cheaper than the genuine proximity ones.

capture

I’m reliably informed that these ones and I imagine others like them work fine with the panel. They are pretty cheap too so well worth a look. I’ve not tried them before but I’ll get some in to play with. I’ve always been a little unsure about them though, someone said to me once “well you wouldn’t write your alarm code on your keys” and this is a similar idea. However I think there is value for example if you want to give a tradesmen access for a few days and don’t want to have to set up a new code etc.

You can get much better voltage regulators than the one I bought. There’s been a lot of discussion in the comments but this one has been popular:

capture

It is very hard to argue with the price, and it’s much smaller and neater than the one I  used. I still find it incredible that you can get anything delivered direct from China for less than a dollar all in.

Thanks again for all your contributions, please keep them coming!

Repairing a (fake) PS3 Dualshock 3 controller

I’ve had a PlayStation 3 for a few years and although I don’t play it much it is a fun thing to have around. I got it second hand from CEX some years ago. The controller that came with it was a bit shabby but worked OK and has done for a while. I bought another one along the way.

Just recently one of them stopped charging. Reading around a bit it at first seemed like a battery fault so I ordered a new one. I consulted various guides (including ifixit) and it seemed a simple matter to replace. However, once I got it to bits I was surprised to find it looked rather different inside than the photos.It looked a lot more basic and quite a few bits were missing. Something like this:

I’ve borrowed this picture from another blog, but mine is exactly like the one on the left versus the other one I have which I think is a real one, which looks like the one on the right:

Image result for fake ps3 controller

It is obviously a fake and much more cheaply made that the real one. It seems that there is now a huge industry in faking these controllers, and given the PS3 is now discontinued it seems to be increasingly hard to buy one which is genuine. The packaging etc is all very closely copied and umpteen ebay or Amazon sellers say that they are ‘Official Genuine’ but it seems very likely that they aren’t.

Having said all this, in use the fake controller is (to me anyway) almost indistinguishable from the real one. Also I didn’t really want to have to pay out for a new one so I investigated further. Once I changed the battery, the fault remained. On plugging it in, the four red lights would flash for a few seconds and then go out. I had read elsewhere that the controllers do need a ‘proper’ USB connection to charge, and so I wondered whether the problem lay in the USB connection itself.

The USB socket on the fake controller had been damaged for ages although it didn’t seem to affect it in use. However, it was very loose and looked bad, so the next thing to do was replace it. These controllers use the once-common mini-USB connector, but they are still easy to find on eBay:

usb

The only problem I could see is that it is quite awkward to solder given the very small pins. However I thought it worth a try. I used my combined solder sucker / iron to remove the old socket and clean up the holes:

img_20161110_204439-copy

I’ve taken the board completely out of the casing here and you can see the vibration motors at the bottom.

The new connector fitted well and it proved easier than I thought to solder it in again. The key was to use very small amounts of solder and get the joint heated up properly. The pins were so small that they wicked the solder off the end of the iron and on to the pad with relatively little effort.

Putting it all back together I did some have problem with the ribbon cables connecting some of the buttons together, but after a bit of wiggling it all went back together and now works fine again. The connection is positive and firm as it should be now and it charges from the PS3.

So even a fake controller is worth repairing… and it looks like if I need any more controllers I will have to put up with fakes. Having said that for my purposes they are probably good enough!

Repairing a Dynamode SW240010-R switch

At church we have a combination of computer and audio gear which I am loosely responsible for maintaining, and I’ve written about some of this before. A couple of years ago we rationalised the racks by the computer and as part of this I put in a rack-mounted switch. I was on a budget so ended buying as new from ebay a ‘Dynamode SW240010-R‘.

This was inexpensive (which is why I bought it) and ‘as new’ from ebay. I was a bit wary of it because I wasn’t familiar with the brand but it looked OK and worked fine when installed.

However, a couple of weeks ago it became clear that the network wasn’t working, and one glance at the switch showed that it had failed. The main power light was flashing on and off weakly and none of the individal port lights were working. There wasn’t much time to consider a fix as it was important to get it going, so we bought a new one (TP Link this time). However I wanted to see if the Dynamode could be reapired. From recent experience, I have found that a lot of these failures are due to power supply problems – and specifically capacitors. Particularly in cheap equipment like this the capacitors are of poor quality and deform when they get warm over time. The actual solid state stuff is pretty robust these days and much less likely to fail. The voltages from the power supply wander all over the place and this causes very strange behaviour.

Opening up the unit as expected there was a small power supply board and quite a lot of fresh air:

psu

What was immediately obvious was that one of the capacitors was obviously bulging (circled in red above). It is a 10V 2200uF part, as is the other one on the right hand side. I removed the board, desoldered and replaced both of the capacitors, plugged it back in and held my breath…

Success! The switch now lights up properly and works fine again. Very pleasing to be able to get it going again. It is now surplus to requirements for church so will either keep as a spare or sell on. I am confident now that the replacement capacitors are much better quality than those I removed so hopefully the fault should not recur.