Repairing a (fake) PS3 Dualshock 3 controller

I’ve had a PlayStation 3 for a few years and although I don’t play it much it is a fun thing to have around. I got it second hand from CEX some years ago. The controller that came with it was a bit shabby but worked OK and has done for a while. I bought another one along the way.

Just recently one of them stopped charging. Reading around a bit it at first seemed like a battery fault so I ordered a new one. I consulted various guides (including ifixit) and it seemed a simple matter to replace. However, once I got it to bits I was surprised to find it looked rather different inside than the photos.It looked a lot more basic and quite a few bits were missing. Something like this:

I’ve borrowed this picture from another blog, but mine is exactly like the one on the left versus the other one I have which I think is a real one, which looks like the one on the right:

Image result for fake ps3 controller

It is obviously a fake and much more cheaply made that the real one. It seems that there is now a huge industry in faking these controllers, and given the PS3 is now discontinued it seems to be increasingly hard to buy one which is genuine. The packaging etc is all very closely copied and umpteen ebay or Amazon sellers say that they are ‘Official Genuine’ but it seems very likely that they aren’t.

Having said all this, in use the fake controller is (to me anyway) almost indistinguishable from the real one. Also I didn’t really want to have to pay out for a new one so I investigated further. Once I changed the battery, the fault remained. On plugging it in, the four red lights would flash for a few seconds and then go out. I had read elsewhere that the controllers do need a ‘proper’ USB connection to charge, and so I wondered whether the problem lay in the USB connection itself.

The USB socket on the fake controller had been damaged for ages although it didn’t seem to affect it in use. However, it was very loose and looked bad, so the next thing to do was replace it. These controllers use the once-common mini-USB connector, but they are still easy to find on eBay:

usb

The only problem I could see is that it is quite awkward to solder given the very small pins. However I thought it worth a try. I used my combined solder sucker / iron to remove the old socket and clean up the holes:

img_20161110_204439-copy

I’ve taken the board completely out of the casing here and you can see the vibration motors at the bottom.

The new connector fitted well and it proved easier than I thought to solder it in again. The key was to use very small amounts of solder and get the joint heated up properly. The pins were so small that they wicked the solder off the end of the iron and on to the pad with relatively little effort.

Putting it all back together I did some have problem with the ribbon cables connecting some of the buttons together, but after a bit of wiggling it all went back together and now works fine again. The connection is positive and firm as it should be now and it charges from the PS3.

So even a fake controller is worth repairing… and it looks like if I need any more controllers I will have to put up with fakes. Having said that for my purposes they are probably good enough!

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